Siemens Healthineers is launching a new ultrasound platform intended to improve the imaging of different sized patients while yielding consistent results.

The company is calling the new system Acuson Sequoia, which it describes as a general imaging ultrasound system. The design is intended to achieve images at greater depths without negatively affecting real-time performance, Siemens contends.

Ultrasound is widely used to view features of patients’ internal organs in real time, but results can be spotty with current technology because of variances in body types and ways that clinicians are using ultrasound devices in efforts to compensate. Body variations can include tissue density, stiffness and absorption.

Also See: Philips, IIT Reacts platform enables ultrasound collaboration

“Ultrasound imaging has been plagued by variability,” says Robert Thompson, head of ultrasound at Siemens Healthineers. “With the new Acuson Sequoia, we provide users with a solution that enables real-time imaging for varying patient types, including those with high body-mass indices, without sacrificing image quality and potentially reducing the need for repeat scans and unclear diagnoses.”

The new product uses a newly developed deep abdominal transducer, a high-powered architecture and other innovative features intended to reduce variations in images caused by body types. Siemens says the new platform also offers high-resolution color flow at as much as three times the sensitivity and as much as 20 percent deeper than current technology permits.

The new platform enables image acquisition by incorporating updates to elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound, enabling penetration of image acquisition of as much as 40 centimeters.

Register or login for access to this item and much more

All Health Data Management content is archived after seven days.

Community members receive:
  • All recent and archived articles
  • Conference offers and updates
  • A full menu of enewsletter options
  • Web seminars, white papers, ebooks

Don't have an account? Register for Free Unlimited Access