Providers are still lagging in protecting of IoT devices

Internet of Medical Things devices are making healthcare providers more susceptible to cyberattacks.

Even though these medical devices open a new world of possibilities for helping healthcare organizations provide better care, they are likely to be targeted by hackers, according to a new report from data security firm Irdeto.

In fact, 82 percent of Irdeto-surveyed healthcare organizations reported experiencing an IoT cyberattack.

Research found that operational downtime is the most common impact of a cyberattack, which in itself is likely to compromise patient safety, particularly for providers of critical care.

Healthcare organizations are well aware of the risks and where the key cyber security vulnerabilities exist within their infrastructures, but they do not necessarily have all the tools to address the vulnerabilities.

The most vulnerabilities within provider organizations include the IT network, mobile devices and accompanying apps, and IoT devices, suggesting that network security is no longer enough to prevent significant damage so providers need to factor security at both the app and device level into their strategy.

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Steve Huin

Further, both device manufacturers and the users of Iot devices acknowledge they need to improve security. Failure to address vulnerabilities could result in an attack with an average financial impact of more than $340,000 according to the Irdeto survey.

“The benefits of connectivity in healthcare are clear for all to see, but this growth in connectivity brings vulnerabilities and hackers looking to steal sensitive medical data,” says Steeve Huin, vice president of strategic partnerships at Irdeto. “The industry is clearly aware of the cybersecurity issues it faces and it is now imperative that organizations up-skill and implement robust strategies to ensure patient safety and optimal care while preventing the extra costs that insurance companies must charge as a result of a cyberattack.”

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