Patient care alerts will be available across New York State through the state’s eight regional health information exchanges, through an arrangement enabled by the Statewide Health Information Network for New York.

The statewide expansion will broaden the network’s patient care coordination capabilities, and its executives say it can better serve as a resource to improve healthcare delivery, including reducing readmissions, throughout the state.

The statewide network, known as SHIN-NY connects the eight regional networks, enabling participating healthcare professionals to quickly access and securely exchange electronic health information throughout the state—as long as patients consent to the sharing of their data.

Alerts made available by SHIN-NY enable healthcare providers to get real-time updates about patients presenting for care at any other provider in the state. For example, a subscribing provider can receive an admittance, discharge, transfer alert if a patient enters or is discharged from a hospital. Alerts are a core service offered free of charge to SHIN-NY participants.

Before the service was expanded through SHIN-NY, providers could only receive alerts from other participating professionals within their regional HIE.

The eight regional networks connected by and comprising SHIN-NY include Bronx RHIO, HealtheConnections, HEALTHeLINK, Healthix, HealthlinkNY, Hixny, NYCIG and Rochester RHIO. SHIN-NY connects virtually all the state's hospitals and more than 80,000 healthcare professionals, enabling collaboration and coordination of care.

"Alerting intelligence has proven incredibly valuable within and across our regions," says Rob Hack, chair of the business operations committee of the SHIN-NY and CEO of HealtheConnections, the central New York regional health information exchange accredited as a qualified entity of the SHIN-NY.

"Providers and care teams actively use the service for improved and responsive care by proactively integrating it into their workflow. Connecting the alerts statewide extends the value of the SHIN-NY across the regions of New York State," Hack adds.

The expansion of alerts helps the state’s providers to be more aware of patient treatment and better coordinate care, says Valerie Grey, executive director of the New York eHealth Collaborative, a not-for-profit organization designated by the state to operate SHIN-NY.

"As SHIN-NY continues to expand and advance, we're able to better support and create opportunities for patient-centered, coordinated care," Grey says.

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