Many physicians, dentists and other clinicians say they are highly dissatisfied with the ability of medical devices to meet their needs and expectations.

The attributes of devices that providers most frequently are disappointed include patient outcomes, familiar procedures, efficacy, customer service, basic product features and flexible contract options.

The survey of 9,000 medical professionals was conducted for Vennli, a vendor of a customer choice analytics platform to assess marketing messaging, project pipelines and sales effectiveness. It conducted the survey in which provider respondents selected attributes that are most important to them when purchasing medical devices.

A report, available here, assesses survey results and ties them to marketing opportunities for device manufacturers.

“In the competitive environment of the $43 billion medical device industry, leveraging the voice of the marketplace to create meaningful, differentiated messaging and offerings is an opportunity to drive growth,” says Rachel Mele, general manager of healthcare at Vennli. “Medical device manufacturers can set themselves apart by focusing and outperforming on factors that actually matter to healthcare professionals versus what the manufacturers perceive or assume are purchase drivers.”

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When selecting the top five attributes for purchasing a device, respondents overwhelming considered consistent outcomes (mentioned by 94 percent of respondents), positive patient outcomes (93 percent), durability (88 percent), ease of use (86 percent) and efficacy (86 percent).

On the flip side, the least important attributes when purchasing devices, in order, were innovation, attractive design, education and training, low price and recommendations by an opinion leader.

Survey results show that the attributes of medical devices that providers most want have value, but when Vennli averaged performance scores it found a major disconnect as many device manufacturers were significantly underperforming on attributes most important to providers.