Researchers at the Regenstrief Institute in Indianapolis say they have created a system for tracking the quality of colonoscopies and determining the appropriate intervals between these procedures based on natural language processing  that is as accurate but less expensive than human review.

The study found that in spite of linguistic variation in the way providers at 13 medical centers across the country used words to express the same concept, 95 percent of the time computerized natural language processing was correct regarding type and location of an adenomatous polyp, compared to human expert reviewers who were assumed to be 100 percent correct. As a result, Regenstrief officials said the evidence suggests software can perform the same job in interpreting and correlating colonoscopy and pathology reports as humans, only much faster, reproducibly, and far less expensively.

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