Top IT Concerns, Issues From the HIMSS Survey

Top IT Concerns, Issues From the HIMSS Survey Top IT Concerns, Issues From the HIMSS Survey

While a majority of respondents to the 26th annual HIMSS Leadership Survey reported an increasingly higher stature for IT within their organizations, information system departments will be supporting new initiatives in the years ahead, as healthcare organizations focus on changes in reimbursement.

HIMSS released results of its survey during its annual conference and exposition in Chicago. Results are based on responses from 330 respondents. Data showed increased reliance on healthcare IT to achieve improved care delivery. (Photo: Fotolia)

Patient Satisfaction a Top Priority Patient Satisfaction a Top Priority

Some 87 percent of respondents said improving patient satisfaction would be a top priority for their organization in the next 12 months. Improving patient care, quality of care or outcomes ranked second as a top priority, followed closely by sustaining financial viability, named by 86 percent of respondents.

Rounding out the top five are improving care coordination (75 percent) and improving operational efficiency and lowering operating costs (72 percent).(Photo: Fotolia)

IT as a Strategic Tool IT as a Strategic Tool

When respondents were asked to rate the value of IT in achieving strategic objectives, 81 percent said IT was considered a “highly strategic tool” in their organization. A majority of respondents (76 percent) also said they believe their IT strategic plan fully supports their organization’s overall strategic plan. (Photo: Fotolia)

Eyeing the “Triple Aim” Eyeing the “Triple Aim”

New priorities set out for healthcare organizations by the federal government and other payers are the so-called triple aim – improving the experience of patient care, reducing the cost of care and improving population health. About two-thirds of respondents (68 percent) said IT has helped their organizations improve the quality of care and patient satisfaction.

Fifty-three percent said IT was helping reduce care costs; and 51 percent said IT was helping improve population health. Some 39 percent said IT has helped their organizations achieve a high degree of improvement in all three areas. (Photo: Fotolia)

Improving Patient Care Improving Patient Care

Some 92 percent of respondents said IT was critical in helping their organizations achieve success in at least one healthcare delivery area, and 87 percent IT was key in achieving success in two or more areas. IT made the biggest impact in care coordination (named by 74 percent); improving required quality metrics (73 percent); improving primary care provider efficiency (69 percent); patient experience management (58 percent); and post-acute care management (57 percent). (Photo: Fotolia)

mHealth Finds a Place mHealth Finds a Place

Mobile and telehealth initiatives are growing in importance at healthcare organizations. Nearly half (49 percent) of respondents indicated that their organizations used telemedicine strategies, defined as those that offer real-time interactions between clinicians and patients.

Some 38 percent of respondents said their organizations offer tools that promote enterprise population health management designed to measure patient reported data, but not intended to provide immediate responses. Some 28 percent are using mobile health for remote coaching and education. (Photo: Fotolia)

Engaging Patients Engaging Patients

The vast majority of respondent healthcare organizations are using an Internet-based approach to engage patients. Some 87 percent say they offer a patient portal, while another 82 percent are engaging patients through the organization’s web site. Social media also rates highly to engage patients (57 percent). (Photo: Fotolia)

CIO Influence Grows CIO Influence Grows

When asked who carries the IT message to an organization’s board of directors, some 66 percent identify the CIO as holding the responsibility. By contrast, the CEO is the IT messenger in only 11 percent of organizations, respondents said.

The executive team strongly supports the use of IT, say 79 percent of respondents, and 78 percent say senior executives rely on the CIO to inform and educate them about IT. Nearly three out of four respondents say the CIO is considered to be part of the organization’s executive team. (Photo: Fotolia)

Engaging Clinical Staff Is a Worry Engaging Clinical Staff Is a Worry

Only 51 percent of respondents said they believe that their organizations effectively engage physician leaders in their IT process. Some 57 percent of respondents believe that nursing leaders are engaged in the IT process. (Photo: Fotolia)

Budgets Expected to Rise Slightly Budgets Expected to Rise Slightly

Approximately two-thirds of respondents (63 percent) indicated that they expected that their organization’s IT operating budget would increase in the next year. Another 21 percent of respondents indicated that their IT operating budget would not change in the next year. Only 11 percent of respondents indicated that they expected their IT operating budget to decrease during this time. (Photo: Fotolia)

Want More? Want More?

An executive summary of the 26th Annual HIMSS Leadership Survey is available here.

While a majority of respondents to the 26th annual HIMSS Leadership Survey reported an increasingly higher stature for IT within their organizations, information system departments will be supporting new initiatives in the years ahead, as healthcare organizations focus on changes in reimbursement.

 

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