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Jeremy Siegel

Jeremy Siegel

Jeremy Siegel is the Russell E. Palmer Professor of Finance at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He graduated from Columbia University in 1967, received his Ph.D. in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971. \r\n \r\n Prof. Siegel is the author of numerous professional articles and two books. His bestselling, Stocks for the Long Run, which published its 4th edition in 2008, was named by the Washington Post and Business Week as one of the ten-best investment books of all time. His second book, The Future for Investors: Why the Tried and the True Triumph over the Bold and New (Crown Business) was named one of the best business books published in 2005 by Business Week, the Financial Times, and Barron’s magazines. \r\n \r\n \r\nProf. Siegel has received many awards and citations for his research and excellence in teaching. In November 2003 he was presented the Distinguished Leadership Award by the Securities Industry Association and in May 2005 he was presented the prestigious Nicholas Molodovsky Award by the Chartered Financial Analysts Institute to “those individuals who have made outstanding contributions of such significance as to change the direction of the profession and to raise it to higher standards of accomplishment.”\r\n \r\n Other awards include the Graham and Dodd Award for the best article published in The Financial Analysts Journal in 1993 and the Peter Bernstein and Frank Fabozzi Award for the best article published in The Journal of Portfolio Management in 2000. \r\n \r\n In 1994 Professor Siegel received the highest teaching rating in a worldwide ranking of business school professors conducted by Business Week magazine and in 2001, Forbes named JeremySiegel.com as one of the “Best Business School Professor” websites. \r\nProf. Siegel currently serves as Academic Director of the Securities Industry Institute and Senior Investment Strategy Advisor of WisdomTree Investments, Inc., consulting the firm on its proprietary stock indexes.